Science/Nature

No sign of ‘distressed sperm whale’ in loch

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionSperm whale trapped in Loch Eriboll in HighlandsA search of a Highlands loch has found no sign of a sperm whale believed to be in difficulty earlier this week.The animal, which has been estimated to be up to 9m (30ft) long, was reported to have been tangled in rope in Loch Eriboll, near Durness, Sutherland.Coastguard and British Divers Marine Life Rescue
Science/Nature

Chang’e-4: China space mission lands on Moon’s far side

[ad_1] China has successfully landed robotic spacecraft on the Moon's far side, state media say.An unmanned spacecraft, the Chang'e-4, deployed the static lander and rover touching down in the South Pole-Aitken basin, according to Global Times.The vehicles are carrying instruments to characterise the region's geology, as well as a biological experiment.State media called the landing "a major milestone in space exploration".While past missions have been to the earth-facing side, this
Science/Nature

New Horizons: Nasa probe survives flyby of Ultima Thule

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionWhere is Ultima Thule? BBC Science Editor David Shukman explainsThe US space agency's New Horizons probe has made contact with Earth to confirm its successful flyby of the icy world known as Ultima Thule. The encounter occurred some 6.5bn km (4bn miles) away, making it the most distant ever exploration of an object in our Solar System. New Horizons acquired gigabytes
Science/Nature

Nasa’s New Horizons: Final commands given to distant probe

[ad_1] Image copyright NASA/JHU-APL/SWRI Image caption Artwork: At this stage, scientists can only speculate what Ultima Thule looks like What are likely the final commands before Tuesday's historic flyby of a distant icy world have been sent to Nasa's New Horizons spacecraft. The probe's pass of the 30km-wide object known as Ultima Thule will set a new record for the farthest ever exploration of a Solar System body - at
Science/Nature

The best science long reads of 2018 (part two)

[ad_1] From the search for life in the Universe to fighting fires in Antarctica, here's a festive selection of the best science and environment long reads published on the BBC this year. When flying to Mars is your day job By Mary Halton Image copyright Farah Alibay Image caption Nasa systems engineer Farah Alibay holding a model of a radio currently on its way to Mars Sending missions to Mars
Science/Nature

Ten big science stories of 2018

[ad_1] The year 2018 provided plenty to chew on if you're interested in science and the environment. From the stark warning from climate scientists about the dangers of letting temperatures rise beyond 1.5C to the discovery of a 20km-wide liquid water lake on Mars, it was a memorable year.Here's a rundown of some of 2018's most eye-catching stories. A "safe" limit for warming Image copyright Getty Images A rise in
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Chestnut-killing wasp threatens major harvest

[ad_1] Image copyright Richard Duebel Chestnuts are increasingly used as a form of replacement protein in vegan and vegetarian diets. But a small, invasive wasp from China is threatening the chestnut harvest in Spain. Now government scientists are considering releasing another non-native insect into the environment to keep the wasp population under control.Under the dense green cover of the Genal Valley in southern Spain, Julio Ruiz, a thirty-something farmer is
Science/Nature

Botanical artist brings rare plants back to life

[ad_1] With about one in five of the world's plants facing extinction, scientists are racing to study new species. Scientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, discovered more than 100 plants and fungi that are new to science this year alone, and have revealed some of their top finds. Artist Lucy Smith draws the plants in incredible detail to help record them for posterity. [ad_2] Source link