Technology

Millions using 123456 as password, security study finds

[ad_1] Image copyright AFP Image caption Liverpool FC topped the list of Premier League club names used as passwords Millions of people are using easy-to-guess passwords on sensitive accounts, suggests a study.The analysis by the UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) found 123456 was the most widely-used password on breached accounts.The study helped to uncover the gaps in cyber-knowledge that could leave people in danger of being exploited.The NCSC said
Technology

TED 2019: The start-ups launching in space

[ad_1] Image copyright Rocket Lab Image caption Rocket Lab has had five successful launches from a base in New Zealand Peter Beck is a space entrepreneur with a rocket and launch pad in New Zealand that has permission for flights "every 72 hours for the next 30 years".The 25 satellites his firm Rocket Lab has launched include one from a US high school, which designed a spacecraft to measure the
Technology

Robot dogs pull truck and other tech news

[ad_1] BBC Click's Jen Copestake looks at some of the week's best technology stories including:Tech giants Apple and Qualcomm agree to settle all ongoing lawsuits, putting an end to a long-running battleSony releases the first details about its next PlayStation consoleBoston Dynamics show off their robot dogs that can pull a lorry across a car parkSee more at Click's website and @BBCClick. [ad_2] Source link
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Samsung’s folding phone breaks for reviewers

[ad_1] Image copyright Samsung Image caption Samsung's folding phone was shown off for the first time earlier this year Earlier this week, Samsung sent out its remarkable new folding smartphone to a number of media outlets, including the BBC.Perhaps now it wishes it hadn’t. Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman: The Verge’s Dieter Bohn: CNBC’s Steve Kovach: Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. Samsung said it had received "a few reports" of damage
Technology

The robot that tidies up bedrooms

[ad_1] It's a simple job for a human, but surprisingly tricky for a robot. A company in Japan is trying to teach a pair of machines to bring order to the chaos of child's bedroom, using the same artificial intelligence it uses for self-driving cars and smart factories. This is part of the BBC's Disruptors series. You can read the full article here.Camera: Jiro Akiba; Producer: Ben King; Video editor:
Technology

Gatwick drone attack possible inside job, say police

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The travel plans of about 140,000 people were disrupted as a result of the drone attack The drone attack that caused chaos at Gatwick before Christmas was carried out by someone with knowledge of the airport's operational procedures, the airport has said.A Gatwick chief told BBC Panorama the drone's pilot "seemed to be able to see what was happening on the runway".Sussex Police
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Liverpool ‘dropout’ jailed for Silk Road dark web site

[ad_1] Image copyright Merseyside Police Image caption Thomas White left his degree course after one term A jobless university dropout who created a site on the dark web to sell drugs and child sex abuse images has been jailed. Thomas White launched Silk Road 2.0 less than a month after the FBI closed the original site in 2013.In March, the 24-year-old admitted drug trafficking, money laundering and making 464 indecent
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You cheated not only the game, but you became a meme

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Sega has become well-known in recent years for its use of humour on social media Nobody expects to see themselves trending online.But when one person waded into a debate about difficulty in video games, his somewhat hyperbolic tweet united both sides of the argument.His words have been re-posted thousands of times on Twitter alone, spawning spoofs and parodies created by everyone from regular
Technology

How does it feel to be watched at work all the time?

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption There is a wrong and right way to carry out workplace surveillance Is workplace surveillance about improving productivity or simply a way to control staff and weed out poor performers? Courtney Hagen Ford, 34, left her job working as a bank teller because she found the surveillance she was under was "dehumanising".Her employer logged her keystrokes and used software to monitor how many